GitHub Engineering

An open source parser for GitHub Actions

Since the beta release of GitHub Actions last October, thousands of users have added workflow files to their repositories. But until now, those files only work with the tools GitHub provided: the Actions editor, the Actions execution platform, and the syntax highlighting built into pull requests. To expand that universe, we need to release the parser and the specification for the Actions workflow language as open source. Today, we’re doing that.

Upgrading GitHub from Rails 3.2 to 5.2

On August 15th GitHub celebrated a major milestone: our main application is now running on the latest version of Rails: 5.2.1! :tada:

Towards Natural Language Semantic Code Search

Hubot

Removing jQuery from GitHub.com frontend

We have recently completed a milestone where we were able to drop jQuery as a dependency of the frontend code for GitHub.com. This marks the end of a gradual, years-long transition of increasingly decoupling from jQuery until we were able to completely remove the library. In this post, we will explain a bit of history of how we started depending on jQuery in the first place, how we realized when it was no longer needed, and point out that—instead of replacing it with another library or framework—we were able to achieve everything that we needed using standard browser APIs.

GLB: GitHub's open source load balancer

At GitHub, we serve tens of thousands of requests every second out of our network edge, operating on GitHub’s metal cloud. We’ve previously introduced GLB, our scalable load balancing solution for bare metal datacenters, which powers the majority of GitHub’s public web and git traffic, as well as fronting some of our most critical internal systems such as highly available MySQL clusters. Today we’re excited to share more details about our load balancer’s design, as well as release the GLB Director as open source.

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